Doral

Donald Trump withdraws his lawsuit against Doral

Donald Trump holds a press conference for the opening on the newly renovated golf course on Monday, Jan. 12, 2015. Since August 2014, Doral’s code compliance department has issued more than 100 violations to Trump’s resort — Trump National Doral — “alleging that Trump made or caused to be made unreasonably loud noise on the property in violation of the noise ordinance,” according to Trump’s legal team.
Donald Trump holds a press conference for the opening on the newly renovated golf course on Monday, Jan. 12, 2015. Since August 2014, Doral’s code compliance department has issued more than 100 violations to Trump’s resort — Trump National Doral — “alleging that Trump made or caused to be made unreasonably loud noise on the property in violation of the noise ordinance,” according to Trump’s legal team. MIAMI HERALD STAFF

Donald Trump withdrew a lawsuit he filed against the City of Doral Thursday afternoon.

“In good faith, we have decided to voluntarily withdraw our lawsuit against the City, and we look forward to productive discourse regarding this matter,” said Ed Russo, a Trump representative in South Florida.

On Feb. 12, just weeks after Donald Trump put on the Miss Universe pageant in Doral and was deemed deserving of a key to the city, the mogul filed a lawsuit accusing the city of having an “unconstitutional” noise ordinance. The city had yet to be served.

Trump’s legal team told the Miami Herald that since August 2014, the city’s code compliance department has issued more than 100 violations to Trump’s resort — Trump National Doral. The bulk of the violations are for making “unreasonably loud noise,” regarding Trump performing grass care, mowing and maintenance activities,” records show.

“While the Trump Organization filed a lawsuit earlier this week against the City of Doral in connection with its Noise Ordinance, we had not served the City, nor was it our desire to do so. “We were simply requesting that the City adopt an objective standard for everyone’s benefit, much like in the City of Miami which codified objective noise standards as prescribed by the American National Standards Institute.”

According to the statement made by Russo, Doral’s city manager Edward Rojas is “going to convene a working group of stakeholders to review this matter and provide recommendations.”

According to Sec. 26-128 of Doral’s charter, the cut-off standard for violating the noise law is “unreasonably loud, excessive, unnecessary or unusual noise.”

Trump rejects the accusations against his resort, saying that he has “brand new, very quiet, and environmentally friendly equipment.”

Trump and his attorneys called the ordinance “vague” and had been pushing for the ordinance to be refined and amended since Trump purchased the property out of bankruptcy in 2012.

Daniel Espino, Doral’s city attorney, in a statement Wednesday said that while the city is under no obligation to change its code, it has been willing to entertain solutions so long as it is balanced for residents and the resort.

Espino on Thursday added that he is “pleased that the resort has decided too withdraw the suit and work as a neighbor to resolve the residents’ concerns,” he said. “The City Administration and I also look forward to productive conversations that will lead to balanced solutions that protect the interests of everyone involved.”

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