Community Voices

Liberty City dance program becomes girls’ ‘home away from home’

The travel squad of the Inner City Dance Club in Liberty City performed in Orlando in December at the North American Hip Hop Dance Championships 2018. They won a spot in the 2019 international competitions hosted by United Dance Organisation.
The travel squad of the Inner City Dance Club in Liberty City performed in Orlando in December at the North American Hip Hop Dance Championships 2018. They won a spot in the 2019 international competitions hosted by United Dance Organisation. Photo provided to the Miami Herald

Located in the heart of Liberty City is a dance program that is changing lives.

The Inner City Dance Club of Miami helps financially challenged families and talented youth with the mission “to provide a quality inclusive program that will provide the same experiences as those with a more privileged background.”

“We treat each student as our own,” said Latrice Hill, owner of ICDC. “This is each girl’s home away from home. Daily, we remind our students that they are jewels and no matter where they live, where they are from, or what they may have gone through, they are beautiful, needed, important and valued.”

The travel squad competed in Orlando at the December United Dance Organisation’s North American Hip Hop Dance Championships and won an opportunity to compete internationally in August 2019.

“As you can imagine the girls were super excited as this was their first major competition,” Hill said. “Now, the process begins preparing for their trip to Europe. Lots of practice and fundraising will occur over the next several months.”

The ICDC motto: “The deeper you dig in any inner city, the more likely you are to find its hidden jewels.”

Hill said the Inner City Dance Club of Miami is a village and is proud of its responsibility in keeping that village strong. Looking forward, it is something Hill wants to spread.

“Inner City Dance Club would love to have a program in every inner city throughout the drug-, gang-, poverty-, and violence-ridden cities in the U.S. ICDC will be known as a safe haven where we foster and develop skills in the arts that will give children an additional edge on non-promising circumstances.”

To learn more, and help them out through donations, visit innercitydanceclub.com.

Honors for UM scientist

Hansell with Emps.jpg
In his studies about oceans and carbon, Dennis Hansell has spent time with emperor penguins who live their entire lives on Antarctic ice. Hansell was recently elected a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Photo provided to the Miami Herald

How does the ocean process carbon? Pinecrest resident Dennis Hansell has made it his life’s work to learn more.

He has shared his research findings in more than 100 journal articles, dozens of presentations, and multiple books, about the assessment of global carbon cycling processes and insights into the biogeochemistry of marine-dissolved organic matter.

For his work, the University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science Professor recently was named a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. The election as an AAAS Fellow is an honor bestowed upon members by their peers.

The high honor is a professional achievement that most scientists hope to attain in their career.

Hansell is a professor in the Department of Ocean Sciences at the UM Rosenstiel School. His studies for his Ph.D. from the University of Alaska Fairbanks took him to the Bering and Chukchi Seas. There, he learned about biological productivity through concentrated study of marine mammal and seabird populations.

He developed an expertise in the cycling of carbon through organic matter in seawater, and has spent the past 30 years working “to understand and quantify the processes involved.”

His study and time have included several years at sea on research expeditions to all the major ocean basins and continents.

Hansell also has served on numerous national and international science committees, including chair of the United States Carbon Cycle Science Steering Committee and vice-chair of the international Integrated Marine Biogeochemistry and Ecosystem Research (IMBER) project.

The tradition of AAAS Fellows began in 1874. AAAS members can be considered for the rank of Fellow “if nominated by the steering groups of the association’s 24 sections, or by any three Fellows who are current AAAS members, or by the AAAS chief executive officer.”

This year, 0.3 percent of AAAS members were recognized as Fellows. The lifetime honor comes with “an expectation that recipients maintain the highest standards of professional ethics and scientific integrity.”

Learn more about AAAS and its mission for global public awareness and engagement in science, advocacy for evidence, and promotion of STEM education at aaas.org.

If you have news for this column, please send it to Christina Mayo at christinammayo@gmail.com.
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