Miami-Dade County

Waze and Miami-Dade County to share traffic data

A screen grab of the Waze app when activated at the Miami Herald’s offices in Doral. Note the slowdowns marked in red.
A screen grab of the Waze app when activated at the Miami Herald’s offices in Doral. Note the slowdowns marked in red.

The next time you report an accident in the Waze app, Miami-Dade County might know about it.

The popular navigation app, which relies on users to input real-time information on road conditions, plans to plug its data into Miami-Dade’s own traffic-monitoring system. That should give Waze users quick updates when a burst county water pipe causes a detour and alert the county’s transportation administrators when Waze users are reporting slowdowns from a stalled vehicle.

“We’re soliciting real-time information we didn’t have before,” said Alice Bravo, Miami-Dade’s Transportation director.

The Waze deal, which a Transportation spokeswoman said is cost-free, brings Miami-Dade into a growing list of governments plugged into the app’s traffic-data stream. In exchange for the Waze data, Miami-Dade is providing the Palo Alto, California-based company access to county data, such as traffic-light outages, repair and road-closure alerts from Water and Sewer, and other warnings that can be useful to drivers. Waze says it has about 100,000 users in Miami-Dade.

Mayor Carlos Gimenez, who is running for reelection amid criticism over county traffic, announced the deal at a Thursday press conference. Miami-Dade joins Miami Beach, Tampa, Florida’s Department of Transportation, and other governments in Waze’s Connected Citizens program. In a press release, Gimenez said that smart-phone technology has become a crucial navigation tool for local motorists “and now we can be part of their ride.”

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