Miami-Dade County

‘Breaking the Habit’ broke the rules for charter boats — again, Coast Guard says.

Coast Guard crews boarded the 42-foot pleasure craft, Breaking the Habit, Sept. 7, 2019, after a passenger injury was reported to Coast Guard Sector Miami watchstanders. Crews determined that the vessel was operating in violation of a previous Captain of the Port order and the boarding team terminated the voyage.
Coast Guard crews boarded the 42-foot pleasure craft, Breaking the Habit, Sept. 7, 2019, after a passenger injury was reported to Coast Guard Sector Miami watchstanders. Crews determined that the vessel was operating in violation of a previous Captain of the Port order and the boarding team terminated the voyage. Coast Guard

The owners of a 42-foot pleasure charter boat named Breaking the Habit apparently have a habit of breaking maritime rules.

According to the Coast Guard, the boat has been stopped at least three times since March for not being properly licensed and other violations.

The latest stop was Saturday when crews boarded the boat, which was near the Miami Marine Stadium, after a call came in that a person was hurt.

There were 13 passengers aboard, the Coast Guard said.

Miami-Dade Fire Rescue took the injured passenger to Jackson Memorial Hospital. There are no details on the extent of the person’s injuries or how the person was hurt.

Meanwhile, crews determined “the vessel was operating illegally and in violation of a previous Captain of the Port order.”

That means the boat had been cited before for violations including not having a credentialed mariner and not having an alcohol and drug program for its crew members.

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On March 17, the boat was stopped near Monument Island with 11 passengers. And on April 7, it was stopped near Sea Isle Marina with 15 people aboard.

Owners and operators of illegal charter vessels who have violated a Captain of the Port Order can face more than $94,000 in penalties.

The Coast Guard warned people considering taking a charter to ask questions before going.

“I want to remind people that before getting underway, ask to see the captain’s credentials, vessel inspection certificate, and safety plan,” said Lt. Brandon Earhart, commanding officer of Coast Guard Station Miami Beach. “If there is any doubt, don’t go. Don’t put your life and the lives of your family and friends in the hands of an unlicensed operator.”

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Carli Teproff grew up in Northeast Miami-Dade and graduated from Florida International University in 2003. She became a full-time reporter for the Miami Herald in 2005 and now covers breaking news.
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