Miami-Dade County

On World Mosquito Day, how does Florida stack up among the nation’s most infested places?

Fight mosquitoes with these simple tips

Fight mosquitoes inside and outside with a few simple tips. Remember to cover windows with screens, remove standing water, and cover your skin with long sleeves shirt and pants. And don't forget insect repellent.
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Fight mosquitoes inside and outside with a few simple tips. Remember to cover windows with screens, remove standing water, and cover your skin with long sleeves shirt and pants. And don't forget insect repellent.

A new Where Are Mosquitoes Common study for World Mosquito Day says that Miami is No. 11 among the Top 50 most mosquito-infested cities.

No. 11?

C’mon Miami. We can do better than that. We can get into the Terminix Top 10 for next year’s World Mosquito Day if we all pitch in.

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We can leave standing water from our daily flooding rains puddling in our yards’ planters and bird baths to attract more skeeters.

We can walk around half-naked and pass on using spray with mosquito repelling DEET.

‘One of the deadliest animals’

In all seriousness, you don’t want to do those things. You want to do the opposite. “Drain and cover” water-gathering objects outdoors like planters and water dishes. Cover up and apply mosquito repellents.

The World Health Organization named the mosquito “one of the deadliest animals in the world.”

According to WHO, mosquitoes carry and spread diseases like Zika, dengue, chikungunya and yellow fever. The mosquito “causes millions of deaths every year.”

In 2015, malaria alone caused 438,000 deaths worldwide, WHO reports. “The worldwide incidence of dengue has risen 30-fold in the past 30 years, and more countries are reporting their first outbreaks of the disease,” WHO said.

The named diseases are transmitted to humans by the Aedes aegypti mosquito. More than half of the world’s population — including Florida, which had two locally acquired dengue cases so far in 2019, both in Miami-Dade — live among these species, WHO said.

One other way to celebrate National Mosquito Day?

Be happy we aren’t in these itchy cities in the pest control company’s new survey:

Terminex Top 25.jpg
Terminex released its list of the most mosquito infected cities. Miami ranked No. 11. Terminix

Terminix’s Top 10 mosquito cities

1. Los Angeles

2. Dallas-Fort Worth

3. Houston

4. New York City

5. Washington, D.C.

6. Atlanta

7. Philadelphia

8. Memphis

9. Baltimore

10. Chicago

Four other Florida cities made the Terminix Top 50: Orlando (No. 14), Tampa (No. 16), West Palm Beach (No. 28), Jacksonville (No. 32).

South Floridians might want to spend more time in Broward County. None of its cities made the 50 most mosquito infested list.

Bradenton also fared well by not making the mosquito infestation list. But don’t get complacent. “Drain and cover,” people.

Terminix did its survey by tapping into its data from 300 of its branches nationwide.

World Mosquito Day history

Did you know World Mosquito Day — or #MosqitoDay on social media — isn’t one of those randomly created days like National Peanut Butter and Jelly Day? The day traces its origins back to the first one in 1897.

According to the Days of the Week site, World Mosquito Day was first established when the link between mosquitoes and malaria transmission was discovered by scientist Ronald Ross to raise awareness about the causes of malaria and how it can be prevented.

Miami Herald Real Time/Breaking News reporter Howard Cohen, a 2017 Media Excellence Awards winner, has covered pop music, theater, health and fitness, obituaries, municipal government and general assignment. He started his career in the Features department at the Miami Herald in 1991.
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