Miami-Dade County

He trafficked cocaine near school — and now will serve 9 years in prison, judge rules

Florida Department of Corrections

An Opa-locka man convicted of selling cocaine at his home near an elementary school will serve nine years in federal prison, a judge ruled.

Tavares McCray, 42, was already on felony probation stemming from charges in 2011 for attempted felony murder, robbery and conspiracy to commit robbery.

When he is released, he will be on probation for eight years.

On June 13, 2018, investigators executed a search warrant at McCray’s home at 14260 NW 22nd Place. The home is within 1,000 feet of Nathan B. Young Elementary School, 14120 NW 24th Ave.

According to the U.S. Attorney’s Office, the search warrant came after two controlled purchases of cocaine from the home by investigators.

When investigators entered the home, they found McCray inside with his 15- and 12-year-old daughters and his 2-year-old son. They also found 169.1 grams of powder cocaine and 33.6 grams of crack cocaine packaged for distribution, a Glock 26 firearm loaded with 15 rounds of ammunition and over $2,400 cash, according to the U.S. Attorney’s Office.

“The drugs were concealed in a PVC pipe and a false-bottom paint can,” the office said in a news release. “Additionally, drug paraphernalia used in the manufacture and distribution of narcotics was found on the kitchen counter and in a kitchen drawer.”

McCray was charged with possession with intent to distribute a controlled substance within 1,000 feet of a school, maintaining a drug-involved premises within 1,000 feet of a school, possession of a firearm by a convicted felon and possession of a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime.

In May, a jury found McCray guilty of possession with intent to distribute a controlled substance within 1,000 feet of a school and maintaining a drug-involved premises within 1,000 feet of a school. He was acquitted on the other charges.

Carli Teproff grew up in Northeast Miami-Dade and graduated from Florida International University in 2003. She became a full-time reporter for the Miami Herald in 2005 and now covers breaking news.
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