Miami-Dade County

Seven South Florida beaches are now swimming in poo, health department warns

The red flags flying at the lifeguard station on North Crandon Beach in Key Biscayne means that beach is closed.
The red flags flying at the lifeguard station on North Crandon Beach in Key Biscayne means that beach is closed. cmguerrero@miamiherald.com

UPDATED: As of Saturday, the beaches are still closed for swimming.

Hurricane Florence’s impact on the coast of the Carolinas could lead to dangerous swells and rip tides on South Florida’s beaches. But that’s not the only reason you might opt to stick to building sand castles away from the water for the next few days, at least.

On Wednesday, The Florida Department of Health in Miami-Dade added six more beaches to its no swimming advisory alert: Golden Beach, Sunny Isles, Surfside, North Shore, 53rd Street in Miami Beach, Haulover South and Crandon North.

This makes seven total South Florida beaches because the advisory issued on Sept. 6 for Crandon South remains in effect.

Here’s the recent poop report:

You can go swimming again at Key Biscayne Beach Club, but you still have to rethink your plans to take a dip nearby at Crandon South.

That’s because the health department lifted just one of two swimming advisories it issued on Sept. 6 after finding elevated levels at both sites of enterococci, a bacteria that can lead to urinary tract infections, diverticulitis or meningitis in susceptible individuals.

The department lifted its advisory for Key Biscayne Beach Club on Tuesday when waters tested clean on consecutive days.

The region has struggled this summer with numerous advisories warning bathers of fecal invaders in the waters. Crandon North, for instance, had three swimming advisories issued in a month, most recently just before the Labor Day weekend and with Wednesday’s warning it’s now four times.

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