Miami-Dade County

Rough road ahead: Major I-95 redo project to take 5 years

Transportation executive Mark J. Moshier and Miami police officer Leonardo Carrillo look over plans for a major I-95 project scheduled to start in two years.
Transportation executive Mark J. Moshier and Miami police officer Leonardo Carrillo look over plans for a major I-95 project scheduled to start in two years. El Nuevo Herald

Drivers will have two years to get ready for a new tangle of construction on Interstate 95.

In the most significant I-95 project in Miami-Dade since the installation of toll express lanes, the Department of Transportation plans to replace pavement along with a variety of upgrades.

“We’re due for it,” said Leonardo Carrillo, a Miami police officer who attended a meeting on the project last week.

The pavement project will be carried out in two phases between Northwest Eighth and 79th streets starting in two years, transportation officials said at the public meeting held in the community center at Moore Park, 765 NW 36th Str.

Construction has been a constant on I-95.

The express lanes project rolled out in December 2008 in the northbound lanes between State Road 112 and the Golden Glades Interchange. The second phase, in the southbound lanes, was opened in January 2010. Express lanes are now being extended Broward County.

The most extensive reconstruction of I-95, which took eight years and stretched from Palm Beach County to Miami-Dade, was completed in 1995. At that time, the project — which cost $400 million — was one of the most elaborate in Florida transportation history, requiring more than 500 workers.

In addition to resurfacing, the new project announced Wednesday also includes upgrading existing bridge railings, upgrading drainage and installing electronic message signs.

FDOT officials said the first phase will be done on a stretch from Northwest 8th to 29th streets and last two years. The second phase will stretch from 29th Street to 79th streets and go for three years.

Construction will cost $70 million and is expected to start in September 2017.

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