South Florida

A tropical disturbance may be out in the Atlantic, but South Florida has other plans

Tropical disturbance makes its way across the Atlantic

Satellite imagery shows a tropical disturbance making its way across the Atlantic. The National Hurricane Center says there is a 50 percent change the disturbance develops over the next five days.
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Satellite imagery shows a tropical disturbance making its way across the Atlantic. The National Hurricane Center says there is a 50 percent change the disturbance develops over the next five days.

There are two important things to keep in mind this week when it comes to South Florida weather: sunscreen and water.

Because of a change in wind direction, the eastern parts of Miami-Dade and Broward, will likely see more sun and less rain than last week, the National Weather Service in Miami said.

And even better news: A tropical disturbance (yes, it’s too early for that) that the National Hurricane Center is watching won’t make it too far.

“They are keeping an eye on it, but there is no concern for us here in South Florida,” Larry Kelly, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service said.

Harrison County EMA director Rupert Lacy goes through a list of items you need to prepare for a hurricane, including a few things you may not have thought of.

As of 8 p.m. Sunday, the National Hurricane Center’s weather outlook gave the disturbance, which is hundreds miles southwest of Bermuda, only a 50 percent chance of developing over the next five days.

Meanwhile, in South Florida, the National Weather Service said if coastal areas get any rain because of easterly winds, it will be in the morning. Some parts of western Miami-Dade and Broward have a higher chance of getting a few storms in the afternoon, Kelly said.

But sun will be a recurring theme this week, with temperatures estimated to be in the mid to upper-80s. It may even climb to the 90s in some areas, Kelly said.

“We are definitely in a summer pattern,” Kelly said.

Carli Teproff grew up in Northeast Miami-Dade and graduated from Florida International University in 2003. She became a full-time reporter for the Miami Herald in 2005 and now covers breaking news.
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