South Florida

Watch out for rip currents on South Florida beaches. Alert warns against swimming

How to survive if you get caught in a rip current

Rip currents are powerful, narrow channels of fast-moving water. Rip currents account for 80% of beach rescues, and can be dangerous or deadly if you don't know what to do. This video shows you how to break the grip of the rip.
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Rip currents are powerful, narrow channels of fast-moving water. Rip currents account for 80% of beach rescues, and can be dangerous or deadly if you don't know what to do. This video shows you how to break the grip of the rip.

The National Weather Service in Miami issued a high rip current risk warning for all South Florida beaches Saturday morning and it remains in effect all day, through the evening.

We know it’s hot out there. And that a dip in the ocean is inviting — and apparently the beaches are momentarily free of poop warnings that had plagued South Florida all summer.

But the National Weather Service suggests you might want to rethink your swimming plans this weekend.

These strong rip currents are considered hazardous all along Florida’s Atlantic coast where people splash about or surf.

Rip currents, according to the Miami center, “are powerful channels of water flowing quickly away from shore, which occur most often at low spots or breaks in the sandbar and in the vicinity of structures such as groins, jetties and piers.”

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Some tips for swimmers:

Listen to lifeguards, and pay attention to posted beach patrol flags and signs.

If you get caught in a rip current don’t panic. “Relax and float,” the center suggests.

Don`t swim against the current. If you’re able, swim in a direction following the shoreline.

If that’s not working and you can’t escape the water’s pull, face the shore and call or wave for help.”

Follow @HowardCohen on Twitter.
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