Technology

A self-driving car killed a pedestrian in Arizona. Here’s what that means for Ford’s Miami test.

An Uber driverless car is displayed in a garage in San Francisco in 2016. Uber suspended all of its self-driving testing Monday, March 19, 2018, after what is believed to be the first fatal pedestrian crash involving the vehicles.
An Uber driverless car is displayed in a garage in San Francisco in 2016. Uber suspended all of its self-driving testing Monday, March 19, 2018, after what is believed to be the first fatal pedestrian crash involving the vehicles. AP

Despite the Sunday accident in which a self-driving car killed a pedestrian in Tempe, Ariz., Ford’s autonomous vehicles will remain on South Florida roadways.

Ford announced it had begun testing self-driving cars across Miami-Dade County last month. It has not experienced any accidents, the company said Monday — despite Miami-Dade’s notoriously erratic traffic — and plans to continue its testing program. The company said it has no more than two self-driving cars operating on county roads at the moment.

Although the car involved in the tragic Arizona accident was not a Ford, Uber has used Ford Fusions in the past for its autonomous vehicle testing. Ford says Uber has its own self-driving technology in use in those vehicles.

Uber announced Monday it would suspend its self-driving tests across all cities, which include Tempe, Pittsburgh, San Francisco and Toronto.

Elaine Herzberg, 49, was struck around 10 p.m. as she was walking outside of a crosswalk. A vehicle operator had been behind the wheel at the time she was hit. She was rushed to the hospital but succumbed to her injuries.

Ford will be launching a fleet of self-driving cars in Miami on Tuesday, Feb. 27, 2018. Mayor Carlos Gimenez hopes self-driving cars will help alleviate Miami’s traffic problems.

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