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Alyce Robertson steps down as executive director of Miami Downtown Development Authority

Alyce M. Robertson (far right), executive director of the Miami Downtown Development Authority, at the groundbreaking for The Bond condo tower in Brickell on Wednesday January 22, 2014.
Alyce M. Robertson (far right), executive director of the Miami Downtown Development Authority, at the groundbreaking for The Bond condo tower in Brickell on Wednesday January 22, 2014. MIAMI HERALD STAFF

Miami Downtown Development Authority (DDA) executive director Alyce M. Robertson, who led the agency over 11 years of explosive growth along the city’s central business district, is stepping down from the post.

The move was announced by City of Miami Commissioner Ken Russell during a meeting of DDA board members on April 26. Robertson will continue in the post during a transition period to find her replacement.

Robertson declined to comment for this article.

The DDA is an independent agency of the City of Miami created in 1965 to grow and strengthen the economic vitality of the downtown area. The DDA is funded by a tax levy on properties within its district, which is comprised of 3.8 square miles east of I-95, west of Biscayne Bay, south of I-195 and north of the Rickenbacker Causeway.

The DDA is governed by a 15-member board that includes downtown property owners and residents such as Cervera Real Estate managing partner Alicia Cervera Lamadrid and Miami Worldcenter Group managing director Nitin Motwani.

In a memo sent to board members on May 9, Russell announced the formation of “a special committee to establish a leadership process.”

The downtown Miami area is made up of seven neighborhoods: Brickell, Midtown, Edgewater, Wynwood, Historic Overtown, and the Central Business and Arts & Entertainment districts. The population in the area has grown from 31,000 in 2008, when Robertson joined the DDA, to 92,235 in 2018. It is projected to reach nearly 110,000 by 2021.

During her DDA tenure, Robertson was a vocal proponent of the construction of the Port of Miami Tunnel and oversaw nearly $10 million in beautification efforts to improve sidewalks, lighting and landscape around the district.

Robertson took a six-month leave in 2018 due to health-related issues.

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