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Amazon Prime chooses Florida for new Whole Foods discounts

All Amazon Prime shoppers in Florida can now enjoy discounts at Whole Foods, which is owned by the e-commerce giant.
All Amazon Prime shoppers in Florida can now enjoy discounts at Whole Foods, which is owned by the e-commerce giant. Miami Herald

Attention shoppers: Your Amazon Prime membership can now shave money off the groceries you buy at any Whole Foods location in Florida.

Amazon announced Wednesday it is now offering an additional 10 percent off sale items to Prime members. (Typically hundreds of Whole Foods products are on sale at a given moment.) In addition, Prime members will now enjoy deeper weekly discounts on select popular items.

The discount program is Amazon's latest effort to connect the two companies. Earlier this year, Amazon launched free, two-hour delivery on Whole Foods groceries through its Prime Now service in 10 cities. Eligible Prime members also receive 5 percent back on Whole Foods Market purchases when using the Amazon Prime Rewards Visa Card.

The following deals will be offered to Prime members in Florida stores from May 16 through May 22. Offers rotate weekly.

  • Sustainably-sourced, wild-caught halibut steaks: $9.99 per pound, (save $10 per pound)
  • Organic strawberries: one pound for $2.99 (save $2)
  • Cold brew coffee at Allegro coffee bars: 50 percent off 16-ounce size
  • KIND granola: 11-ounce bag, 2 for $6
  • 365 Everyday Value sparkling water: 12-pack case buy one, get one free
  • Magic Mushroom Powder: 50 percent off

To receive these exclusive deals and savings, Prime members must scan their Whole Foods Market app at checkout. Customers can also go to the Whole Foods Market app to learn about offers each week.

Amazon Prime Vice President Cem Sibay said Florida was chosen as the first state for new the Prime program because Whole Foods has a large presence in the Sunshine State, with 28 stores, including 11 in Broward and Miami-Dade South Florida.

Amazon purchased Whole Foods for more than $13 billion last summer.

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