Karina Krulig, Romina Krulig-Vaisberg, Yoel Vaisberg and Sara Gelrud, 11, pass a loaf of bread during Shabbat dinner at Wynwood Yard on Saturday, January 20, 2018. Several restaurants in Miami have started to offer communal dinners for what, traditionally, has been a holy and traditional Jewish meal eaten with family or after temple to mark the start of the Sabbath on Friday night. The dinners are not kosher. Instead, these shabbat meals are about community, bonding over a meal.
Karina Krulig, Romina Krulig-Vaisberg, Yoel Vaisberg and Sara Gelrud, 11, pass a loaf of bread during Shabbat dinner at Wynwood Yard on Saturday, January 20, 2018. Several restaurants in Miami have started to offer communal dinners for what, traditionally, has been a holy and traditional Jewish meal eaten with family or after temple to mark the start of the Sabbath on Friday night. The dinners are not kosher. Instead, these shabbat meals are about community, bonding over a meal.
Karina Krulig, Romina Krulig-Vaisberg, Yoel Vaisberg and Sara Gelrud, 11, pass a loaf of bread during Shabbat dinner at Wynwood Yard on Saturday, January 20, 2018. Several restaurants in Miami have started to offer communal dinners for what, traditionally, has been a holy and traditional Jewish meal eaten with family or after temple to mark the start of the Sabbath on Friday night. The dinners are not kosher. Instead, these shabbat meals are about community, bonding over a meal.