Travel

Travel notes: museums

Films to be shown at the Museum of Modern Art’s celebration of Jerry Lewis’ 90th birthday will include “The Ladies Man,” which Lewis directed.
Films to be shown at the Museum of Modern Art’s celebration of Jerry Lewis’ 90th birthday will include “The Ladies Man,” which Lewis directed. Museum of Modern Art

▪ The Museum of Modern Art in New York will celebrate Jerry Lewis’ 90th birthday next month with a retrospective of some of his films, nearly all presented in rare 35mm prints. Lewis’ birthday is March 16; the screenings will be March 1-15 and will be shown at the Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters.

Highlights include The Ladies Man (1961), directed by Lewis; That’s My Boy (1951), one of his first with Dean Martin; The Bellboy (1960), Lewis’ directorial debut; Rock-a-Bye Baby (1958), one of his solo films; and Martin Scorsese’s The King of Comedy (1982), one of Lewis’ last films.

Details: www.moma.org/calendar/film.

▪ The Mob Museum in Las Vegas will debut a permanent display from the TV show Breaking Bad on Friday. Among the items in the exhibit: the yellow hazmat suit worn by Walter White (played by Bryan Cranston) when he cooked up a batch of meth. Two gas masks and a rubber apron worn during the series will also be on view.

Breaking Bad, which won 16 Emmys and two Golden Globes, tells the story of White, a high school chemistry teacher who manufactures and sells methamphetamine after he learns he has inoperable lung cancer.

Breaking Bad effectively dramatized organized crime and today’s illicit drug trade,” says Geoff Schumacher, director of content at The Mob Museum, the National Museum of Organized Crime and Law Enforcement.

Details: http://themobmuseum.org

▪ Opening Sunday at the Barnes Foundation in Philadelphia is Picasso: The Great War, Experimentation and Change. The exhibition, done in partnership with the Columbus Museum of Art, examines the dramatic fluctuations in Picasso’s style from 1912 to 1924, a period that encompasses World War I. About 50 works by Picasso plus a few by his friends and contemporaries will make up the show.

According to the museum, the exhibition looks closely at the strange ambivalence characterizing Picasso’s wartime production, exploring it in connection with changes to his personal life, with his misgivings about cubism, and with the political meanings ascribed to cubism during the war.

The exhibition runs through May 9, then will travel to the Columbus Museum of Art in June. Details: www.barnesfoundation.org.

MIAMI HERALD STAFF

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