Health & Fitness

5 things to know about Miami Cardiac & Vascular Institute’s expansion at Baptist Health

Medical staff works in the Cardiac Catheterization Lab at the Miami Cardiac & Vascular Institute at Baptist Hospital on March 2, 2017. The institute underwent a $120 million expansion project.
Medical staff works in the Cardiac Catheterization Lab at the Miami Cardiac & Vascular Institute at Baptist Hospital on March 2, 2017. The institute underwent a $120 million expansion project. pfarrell@miamiherald.com

Five theater-style leather chairs, complete with cupholders, sit in front of several large TV screens.

But the people sitting won’t be watching a movie. Instead, medical students, observers and nurses will watch a live-action film of sorts — the operating room in front of them, separated only by glass.

This is what the Miami Cardiac & Vascular Institute at Baptist Health looks like after a $120 million expansion meant to be a “platform for innovation,” Dr. Barry Katzen, the chief medical executive and founder of the institute, said Thursday at its unveiling.

“It’s not about what we are doing now,” he said. “It’s about what we can do in the future.”

Here are five things to know about the expansion:

By the numbers

▪ The three-year, $120 million project added 60,000 square feet and included 40,000 square feet of renovations, for 150,000 square feet in total.

▪ The Miami Cardiac & Vascular Institute has 76 doctors and 1,100 employees and treats 125,000 patients in a year. The new wing has four advanced endovascular suites with gallery viewing areas for teaching.

In the sunshine

Katzen, who founded the institute in 1987, said that when creating the new space the goal was to create a transparent environment.

“Everything is about working collaboratively,” he said.

The suites have a glass wall so that anyone walking on the main floor can see what’s going on inside — unless the shades are down while the patient is being prepped.

“The glass and the ability to see everywhere and see each other reflects the philosophy of transparency that we have here,” he said. “Everybody here is working in the sunshine.”

On the wall

Hanging on the wall are pictures of the hospital’s success stories.

David Navarro, for example, was having dinner with his friends when he experienced sudden cardiac arrest, according to one poster. Within 19 minutes of arriving at the hospital, “doctors from the Institute were able to open his arteries, re-establish a pulse and initiate a neuro-protection protocol to prevent any brain damage due to the lack of blood getting to the brain.”

The institute treats patients with heart disease, strokes and other cardiovascular diseases.

A road map

Everything inside is “dedicated to image-guided therapy,” Katzen said.

The hospital has partnered with Royal Philips, a healthcare technologies company, for more than 30 years. A new device, the Philips Azurion Image Guided Therapy System, will give doctors a “road map” to fix clots and other cardiovascular issues in a less invasive way, Katzen said.

Frans van Houten, CEO of Royal Philips, the Dutch company, flew over from Amsterdam Thursday for a tour.

“I have visited many hospitals in the world and everybody tries to do a good job and then you have a superior job and that’s here,” he said. “Dr. Katzen is pushing the envelope as far as possible.”

Looking to the future

Katzen said doctors have had brainstorming sessions to help them prepare for what could be in the future.

He said a treatment to stop the bleeding of a pregnant woman by blocking the flow with balloons — a common treatment now — was developed because a patient was dying. She lived, and doctors there have delivered 10 babies.

Bo Boulenger, CEO of Baptist Hospital, said that with heart disease and stroke being among the top causes of death and disability in the United States, the hospital is “ground zero” for treatment.

“It’s all about the innovative ideas,” he said.

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