Food & Drink

Florida loves fast food so much, three cities just made it onto a list

Burger King was among the national hamburger chains that have seen thousands in spending by political committees during the 2018 election.
Burger King was among the national hamburger chains that have seen thousands in spending by political committees during the 2018 election. AP/Miami Herald file

The Sunshine State? We love hot weather — and quick, convenient food.

Rental resource site Apartment Guide is out with its list of top 10 cities for fast food lovers in the country — and three Florida cities made the list.

This is not a huge surprise, according to the survey called “Best Cities in America for Fast Food Lovers.”

“It’s a state of convenience for vacationers and working-class residents, with a crisscross of interstates and a low cost of living.”

No. 1 on the list?

That would be Orlando, home to Walt Disney World — and tourists galore, many of whom are miniature adults.

“After a long day of rides and lines, sightseers and visitors gravitate towards fast food. It’s a known quantity, consistent taste nationwide, and will satisfy a hungry, fussy child,” Apartment Guide says. “People enjoy the familiar, and nothing is as familiar as the Golden Arches or the red-and-white striped bucket.”

Locals scoop up the accessible, affordable stuff too: There’s one fast food joint for every 1,058 Orlandoans.

As for No. 2, that’s where Miami rolls in.

Residents here may adore their Cuban sandwiches and croquetas, but obviously crave their burgers and fries, too: There’s a fast food eatery for every 1,457 residents, reports the study.

The Magic City has 318 fast food chains in total, including 19 KFC’s, 34 Wendy’s, 45 Burger Kings (and the corporate headquarters) and 110 Subways. (The number of Burger Kings makes sense, as Miami is home to the company’s headquarters.)

Tampa grabs the No. 8 slot, with a fast food restaurant for every 1,927 folks, including about two dozen each of Pizza Huts, McDonald’s and Burger Kings, as well as 66 Subways.

Just because we have all these fast food places doesn’t mean you should hit up one every day.

“If you’re eating fast food with any sort of regular frequency, you’re typically going to be getting more saturated fat, more sodium, and more sugar than you would if were cooking at home,” dietitian Lindsay Malone recently told the Cleveland Clinic. “Typically, you’re not going to get a lot of fruits or vegetables, and what’s available will be lower in nutritional value.”

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