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Peacock runs off with wild turkeys, Vermont family tries to ‘catch the little twerp’

A Vermont family is trying to lure their pet peacock home after it ran off with area turkeys and wouldn’t come back. The peacock owners have sought help from the state’s fish and wildlife officials.
A Vermont family is trying to lure their pet peacock home after it ran off with area turkeys and wouldn’t come back. The peacock owners have sought help from the state’s fish and wildlife officials. Screenshot from WCAX

A Vermont family has a message for their runaway peacock: Please come home.

Brian and Rene Johnson, the Springfield, Vermont, couple who own the peacock, said it left home to join a band of wild turkeys more than a month ago, WCAX reported. Eager to get their pet bird back, the family reached out to state fish and wildlife officials.

“My peacock has run off with the turkeys. Do you have any suggestions on how to catch the little twerp?” the family asked, according to a Facebook post Tuesday from Vermont’s department of Fish & Wildlife. “I do not believe they can breed.”

The bird’s whereabouts are hardly a mystery. Luring the bird back home is the hard part.

“I know where he is most days,” the family told fish and wildlife officials.

The Johnsons spoke to local TV station WCAX as they looked up into a tree at their runaway bird, which refused to come down.

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The peacock goes by a variety of names, including Walter, Forest and Pea, WCAX reported.

“Not only is he confused about his name, but his species as well,” Rene Johnson told the TV station.

It turns out peacock-turkey friendships aren’t unheard of. A Rhode Island family who found a stray peacock in their backyard said in August that the bird would wander into the woods with wild turkeys, the Providence Journal reported.

And in British Columbia, a wild peacock that showed up at a farmhouse tried to be more than friends with a resident turkey, CTV reported in 2017.

“The peacock is kind of in love with the turkey,” said Mark Hogeweide, who owns the farm, according to CTV Vancouver. “He’s tried to (expletive) her.”

Though they may look quite different, peacocks and turkeys have at least one thing in common: their intelligence, or lack thereof.

“They’re about as bright as a domesticated turkey,” Cincinnati Zoo bird curator Robert Webster said of peacocks, according to The Washington Post. “Which is to say, they ain’t got much going for them.”

A woman flying from New Jersey’s Newark Liberty International Airport on January 28 had her request to bring her emotional support animal on board declined by United Airlines – her support animal was a peacock.

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