Music & Nightlife

Creators hope the music world gets a jolt with planned internet TV series

John Caignet, left, and Frank Guzman of ‘Sound Waves’ on Jolt Radio.
John Caignet, left, and Frank Guzman of ‘Sound Waves’ on Jolt Radio. Photo provided to the Miami Herald

John Caignet, the creative force behind Allapattah-based internet station Jolt Radio, is hoping to give television a new-age MTV-style program dubbed Sound Waves.

The $1,600 pilot was a response from Caignet and producers Frank Guzman, Ammy Juliet and Walter Rivera to the lack of quality television production around music.

Now that MTV has gone the way of reality television and mega-sites like YouTube host online music videos, Caignet and Guzman thought it would be the perfect time to introduce their show and reintroduce viewers to music television.

FINAL TheSoundWavesShow_PilotPoster
Poster illustration by Frank Guzman Provided to the Miami Herald

Currently, only the pilot has been filmed and stars Caignet as Mr. Jolt, whose plant friend is played by Guzman. The fictional and trippy aspect of the show mixes an imagined storyline with real elements such as live musical performance, interviews with artists and music recommendations. Guzman said they’re premiering music videos to showcase independent and obscure talent like the one found in Miami to an international platform.

“It’s like The Tonight Show meets Pee-wee Herman and Alice in Wonderland,” Guzman said. “One of the main points of the show is to have an audience be a part of the show by participating, calling in and driving it.”

Sound Waves will also have multidisciplinary artists who may not directly be influenced by music. In the pilot episode, they have Eileen and Jonathan Andrade of Finka Table and Tap talking about the restaurant business and their journey.

Both Guzman and Caignet want the show to give a voice to other types of talent in South Florida. They also want the entertainment to be educational.

“There are going to be episodes that will teach music lessons. There will be audience member interaction, and there’s a segment we called Stream Tube, where the viewers could stream their music videos. Kids in middle America or Spain could quickly submit the music video they did in their garage, and we may choose it for the show,’’ Guzman said. “The shows are written for everyone, but gives exposure to creatives and people who enjoy their creativity.”

Caignet and Guzman have been working on this project for over four years and have an entire eight-episode season scripted. Guzman created the concept and merged the idea with Caignet’s radio station. Each show is roughly about 20 minutes, and the idea fit as an added leg to Caignet’s already popular radio station.

With the help of the pair’s creative friends, the entire pilot episode was put together family style, with everyone adding what they could to make it happen. There’s even a party scene, in which Caignet’s neighbors at the radio station lent the team their space to filming.

Caignet and Guzman said it’s been humbling to see all of their friends and supporters come together for their vision and would not have been able to get this far without them. They hope the show will be picked up by the likes of Adult Swim or even Vice to bring the remaining episodes to life.

“The show intends to be an extension of the Miami community the way Jolt Radio is a platform for music in Miami,” Guzman said. “That’s what this is about, bringing everyone together.”

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