Books

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, sanctioned in the Senate, has a new book on the way

Holding a transcript of her speech in the Senate Chamber, Democratic Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts reacts to being rebuked by the Senate leadership and accused of impugning a fellow senator, Sen. Jeff Sessions, R-Ala., the attorney general nominee, in Washington.
Holding a transcript of her speech in the Senate Chamber, Democratic Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts reacts to being rebuked by the Senate leadership and accused of impugning a fellow senator, Sen. Jeff Sessions, R-Ala., the attorney general nominee, in Washington. AP

After being sanctioned while trying to read a letter by Coretta Scott King during the attorney general debate in the Senate Tuesday, U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren dominated the news cycle and kicked off the Twitter hashtags, #LetLizTalk and #ShePersisted.

Almost immediately, a line of “Nevertheless, she persisted” merchandise popped up on Amazon.com (the phrase is taken from Sen. Mitch McConnell’s rebuke.)

In April, the Democrat from Massachusetts, who was arguing against the confirmation of Sen. Jeff Sessions, persists further with her new book “This Fight Is Our Fight: The Battle to Save America’s Middle Class,” which lays out her ideas on progressive economics.

The book, published by Henry Holt imprint Metropolitan, offers a history of the middle class, according to the Associated Press and will include “candid accounts of her battles in the Senate, vivid stories about her life and work, and powerful descriptions of the experiences of working Americans.”

The book is due out April 18.

Warren, also the author of “A Fighting Chance,” will donate a portion of her proceeds to food banks based in Massachusetts, according to the AP.

After she was sanctioned, four male senators read the King letter, including Vermont’s Bernie Sanders. Warren thanked them all via Twitter.

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