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In Puerto Rico, which has a long-running addiction crisis, the few programs that help addicts are struggling to provide services. 3:17

In Puerto Rico, which has a long-running addiction crisis, the few programs that help addicts are struggling to provide services.

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Thousands line up for food aid outside of Tropical Park

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Catastrophic claims specialist help South Florida after Irma

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FEMA stages site in Hialeah for crews working on clearing storm debris

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Tense police car chase in Puerto Rico

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Miami Beach residents begin clean up after Hurricane Irma

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7.1 magnitude earthquake rocks Central Mexico

Timelapse shows Hurricane Irma making its way through Miami Beach 5:17

Timelapse shows Hurricane Irma making its way through Miami Beach

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Florida opens disaster food assistance program to provide Irma relief

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  • Travelers in Puerto Rico face long waits, limited power in terminals after Hurricane Maria

    Miami Herald reporter Patricia Mazzei and photojournalist Carl Juste boarded one of the earliest flights out of San Juan flying back to Miami on Sunday, Sept. 24, 2017. Mazzei recaps her reporting since Hurricane Maria devastated the U.S. territory.

Miami Herald reporter Patricia Mazzei and photojournalist Carl Juste boarded one of the earliest flights out of San Juan flying back to Miami on Sunday, Sept. 24, 2017. Mazzei recaps her reporting since Hurricane Maria devastated the U.S. territory. Carl Juste cjuste@miamiherald.com
Miami Herald reporter Patricia Mazzei and photojournalist Carl Juste boarded one of the earliest flights out of San Juan flying back to Miami on Sunday, Sept. 24, 2017. Mazzei recaps her reporting since Hurricane Maria devastated the U.S. territory. Carl Juste cjuste@miamiherald.com

This is what it’s like to fly out of the San Juan airport after Hurricane Maria

September 25, 2017 11:30 AM

More Videos

In Puerto Rico, which has a long-running addiction crisis, the few programs that help addicts are struggling to provide services. 3:17

In Puerto Rico, which has a long-running addiction crisis, the few programs that help addicts are struggling to provide services.

Thousands line up for food aid outside of Tropical Park 1:19

Thousands line up for food aid outside of Tropical Park

Catastrophic claims specialist help South Florida after Irma 2:14

Catastrophic claims specialist help South Florida after Irma

FEMA stages site in Hialeah for crews working on clearing storm debris 1:22

FEMA stages site in Hialeah for crews working on clearing storm debris

Tense police car chase in Puerto Rico 3:39

Tense police car chase in Puerto Rico

Miami Beach residents begin clean up after Hurricane Irma 1:41

Miami Beach residents begin clean up after Hurricane Irma

7.1 magnitude earthquake rocks Central Mexico  1:47

7.1 magnitude earthquake rocks Central Mexico

Timelapse shows Hurricane Irma making its way through Miami Beach 5:17

Timelapse shows Hurricane Irma making its way through Miami Beach

Florida opens disaster food assistance program to provide Irma relief 1:22

Florida opens disaster food assistance program to provide Irma relief

Race is on to record Hurricane Irma's storm surge 2:07

Race is on to record Hurricane Irma's storm surge

  • In Puerto Rico, which has a long-running addiction crisis, the few programs that help addicts are struggling to provide services.

    Workers from an organization called Mountain Point provide drug-users with packets of clean syringes, mounds of antibacterial wipes and rolls of gauze from a dwindling supply. Their goal in the wake of the storm is to keep opioid users in Puerto Rico free from deadly diseases they could get from injecting drugs.