‘We don’t close for anything,’ said Barbara Metzger, serving $1.25 orange and rasberry jello shots, Marlboros, pickled eggs and Budweiser at the Drift In, one of the only businesses in Bradenton, Fla., that was open Saturday night as Hurricane Irma approached. She has worked there 21 years. They did plan to close Sunday.
‘We don’t close for anything,’ said Barbara Metzger, serving $1.25 orange and rasberry jello shots, Marlboros, pickled eggs and Budweiser at the Drift In, one of the only businesses in Bradenton, Fla., that was open Saturday night as Hurricane Irma approached. She has worked there 21 years. They did plan to close Sunday. Julie K. Brown Miami Herald Staff
‘We don’t close for anything,’ said Barbara Metzger, serving $1.25 orange and rasberry jello shots, Marlboros, pickled eggs and Budweiser at the Drift In, one of the only businesses in Bradenton, Fla., that was open Saturday night as Hurricane Irma approached. She has worked there 21 years. They did plan to close Sunday. Julie K. Brown Miami Herald Staff

Last call: As Irma howls toward Bradenton, bar serves pickled eggs and beer

September 10, 2017 10:08 AM

UPDATED September 10, 2017 10:08 AM

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