A Navy doctor at Guantanamo who refused to have his face photographed and called himself "'Cmdr. SMO," short for Senior Medical Officer, told visiting reporters in September  2010 that one captive hadn't consumed solid food for four years at that point. He was showing reporters the size of the feeding tube and flavors used in the Guantanamo hunger striker renourishment program in this image that was approved for release by a sailor at the US Navy base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
A Navy doctor at Guantanamo who refused to have his face photographed and called himself "'Cmdr. SMO," short for Senior Medical Officer, told visiting reporters in September 2010 that one captive hadn't consumed solid food for four years at that point. He was showing reporters the size of the feeding tube and flavors used in the Guantanamo hunger striker renourishment program in this image that was approved for release by a sailor at the US Navy base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. THE MIAMI HERALD
A Navy doctor at Guantanamo who refused to have his face photographed and called himself "'Cmdr. SMO," short for Senior Medical Officer, told visiting reporters in September 2010 that one captive hadn't consumed solid food for four years at that point. He was showing reporters the size of the feeding tube and flavors used in the Guantanamo hunger striker renourishment program in this image that was approved for release by a sailor at the US Navy base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. THE MIAMI HERALD

Guantánamo

Medical ethicists say stop Guantánamo force-feeding

June 12, 2013 7:05 PM

  Comments  

Videos

Special Reports



About Carol Rosenberg

Carol Rosenberg

@CarolRosenberg

Carol Rosenberg reports on Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, the place, policy, people, war court.