Students at Union House Elementary School, including, Aiyie Her, 7, left, and Elizabeth Khang, 7, eat dinner during an after-school program that was created after Congress passed the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act. Schools nationally began phasing in provisions of the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act in 2012. A year later, the average daily student participation rate for total lunches served began falling. A year ago, it had declined by about 1.2 million, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.
Students at Union House Elementary School, including, Aiyie Her, 7, left, and Elizabeth Khang, 7, eat dinner during an after-school program that was created after Congress passed the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act. Schools nationally began phasing in provisions of the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act in 2012. A year later, the average daily student participation rate for total lunches served began falling. A year ago, it had declined by about 1.2 million, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Autumn Cruz acruz@sacbee.com
Students at Union House Elementary School, including, Aiyie Her, 7, left, and Elizabeth Khang, 7, eat dinner during an after-school program that was created after Congress passed the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act. Schools nationally began phasing in provisions of the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act in 2012. A year later, the average daily student participation rate for total lunches served began falling. A year ago, it had declined by about 1.2 million, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Autumn Cruz acruz@sacbee.com

National

May 16, 2016 12:52 PM

Fewer students eat school lunches as menus get healthier

  Comments  

Videos

Nation & World Videos