The rock python first turned up about 2001 and has so far only been spotted in the 2,800-acre Bird Drive basin off the Tamiami Trail. But fear that rock pythons could explode like the Burmese prompted the state for the first time to hire a biologist whose sole job is to ferret out the invasive species.
The rock python first turned up about 2001 and has so far only been spotted in the 2,800-acre Bird Drive basin off the Tamiami Trail. But fear that rock pythons could explode like the Burmese prompted the state for the first time to hire a biologist whose sole job is to ferret out the invasive species. Al Diaz MIAMI HERALD STAFF
The rock python first turned up about 2001 and has so far only been spotted in the 2,800-acre Bird Drive basin off the Tamiami Trail. But fear that rock pythons could explode like the Burmese prompted the state for the first time to hire a biologist whose sole job is to ferret out the invasive species. Al Diaz MIAMI HERALD STAFF

Rock python might hold clues in Florida about invasive snakes

January 29, 2015 07:58 PM

UPDATED January 29, 2015 08:23 PM

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