Shark River empties into Ponce de Leon Bay at the southernmost end of the Everglades. In 2014, 75 percent of voters endorsed an amendment to spend a third of taxes on real estate deals to save such wild land. But a spending plan being considered this week by lawmakers allocates only a fraction for purchasing new land for the second year in a row.
Shark River empties into Ponce de Leon Bay at the southernmost end of the Everglades. In 2014, 75 percent of voters endorsed an amendment to spend a third of taxes on real estate deals to save such wild land. But a spending plan being considered this week by lawmakers allocates only a fraction for purchasing new land for the second year in a row. Tim Chapman Miami Herald Staff
Shark River empties into Ponce de Leon Bay at the southernmost end of the Everglades. In 2014, 75 percent of voters endorsed an amendment to spend a third of taxes on real estate deals to save such wild land. But a spending plan being considered this week by lawmakers allocates only a fraction for purchasing new land for the second year in a row. Tim Chapman Miami Herald Staff

With conservation money, Florida lawmakers aim to foot other bills

February 08, 2016 05:31 PM

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