Florida Power and Light workers replaced wood poles with sturdier concrete poles after a record number of hurricanes hit South Florida between 2004 and 2005.
Florida Power and Light workers replaced wood poles with sturdier concrete poles after a record number of hurricanes hit South Florida between 2004 and 2005. J. Albert Diaz Miami Herald Staff
Florida Power and Light workers replaced wood poles with sturdier concrete poles after a record number of hurricanes hit South Florida between 2004 and 2005. J. Albert Diaz Miami Herald Staff

Study finds South Florida power grid vulnerable to sea rise and hurricanes

October 27, 2015 06:43 PM

UPDATED October 28, 2015 09:53 PM

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