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  • Miami Beach waging a battle against sea level rise

    Miami Beach has put into action an aggressive and expensive plan to combat the effects of sea level rise. As some streets keep flooding from recent king tide events, the city continues rolling out its plan of attack and will spend between $400-$500 million over the next five years doing so.

Miami Beach has put into action an aggressive and expensive plan to combat the effects of sea level rise. As some streets keep flooding from recent king tide events, the city continues rolling out its plan of attack and will spend between $400-$500 million over the next five years doing so. Emily Michot emichot@miamiherald.com
Miami Beach has put into action an aggressive and expensive plan to combat the effects of sea level rise. As some streets keep flooding from recent king tide events, the city continues rolling out its plan of attack and will spend between $400-$500 million over the next five years doing so. Emily Michot emichot@miamiherald.com

Beyond the high tides, South Florida water is changing

October 25, 2015 10:19 PM

UPDATED October 31, 2015 08:32 PM

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  • 17-foot python breaks record after being caught in Florida Everglades

    The South Florida Water Management District released a video on their twitter account Monday showing a record breaking 17-foot-1-inch Burmese python that was caught by Jason Leon.