Environment

October 3, 2015 5:52 PM

Dying seagrass and ‘yellow fog’ signal trouble for Florida Bay

Severe summer drought, lack of historic flow kill miles of seagrass

Stinky yellow water appears; fish begin to disappear

Scientists fear that lethal algae blooms, which plagued bay decades ago, could return

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