As Florida Bay wilted over the summer during a deepening drought, scientists arrived to find miles of dead seagrass smelling like rotten eggs in a cloud of yellow sulfide. They suspect hot, salty water from adjacent mud banks slid into the bay and created a lid that trapped sulfide in the muddy bottom and kept oxygen out. Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission
As Florida Bay wilted over the summer during a deepening drought, scientists arrived to find miles of dead seagrass smelling like rotten eggs in a cloud of yellow sulfide. They suspect hot, salty water from adjacent mud banks slid into the bay and created a lid that trapped sulfide in the muddy bottom and kept oxygen out. Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission

Environment

Dying seagrass and ‘yellow fog’ signal trouble for Florida Bay

October 03, 2015 5:52 PM

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