More Videos

Miami mayor makes case for infrastructure improvements to protect from King Tide flooding 1:34

Miami mayor makes case for infrastructure improvements to protect from King Tide flooding

Trump feuds with Congresswoman over call to fallen soldier's widow 1:16

Trump feuds with Congresswoman over call to fallen soldier's widow

Tense police car chase in Puerto Rico 3:39

Tense police car chase in Puerto Rico

Trump addresses relationship with Congress, soldier deaths in Niger and more 3:07

Trump addresses relationship with Congress, soldier deaths in Niger and more

Lawmakers tour Miami-Dade juvenile lockup 1:35

Lawmakers tour Miami-Dade juvenile lockup

Miami Beach police chief holds press conference after woman is killed by officer 1:35

Miami Beach police chief holds press conference after woman is killed by officer

Dolphins coach Adam Gase says he only listens to himself on coaching decisions 1:14

Dolphins coach Adam Gase says he only listens to himself on coaching decisions

How to make money playing video games 2:10

How to make money playing video games

How the Caribbean is trying to ‘Return to Happiness’ post hurricanes Irma and Maria 2:09

How the Caribbean is trying to ‘Return to Happiness’ post hurricanes Irma and Maria

A Miami congressional candidate talks about her encounters with extraterrestrials 8:56

A Miami congressional candidate talks about her encounters with extraterrestrials

  • Yellow fog spreads across Florida Bay

    As Florida Bay wilted over the summer during a deepening drought, scientists arrived to find miles of dead seagrass smelling like rotten eggs in a cloud of yellow sulfide. They suspect hot, salty water from adjacent mud banks slid into the bay and created a lid that trapped sulfide in the muddy bottom and kept oxygen out.

As Florida Bay wilted over the summer during a deepening drought, scientists arrived to find miles of dead seagrass smelling like rotten eggs in a cloud of yellow sulfide. They suspect hot, salty water from adjacent mud banks slid into the bay and created a lid that trapped sulfide in the muddy bottom and kept oxygen out. Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission
As Florida Bay wilted over the summer during a deepening drought, scientists arrived to find miles of dead seagrass smelling like rotten eggs in a cloud of yellow sulfide. They suspect hot, salty water from adjacent mud banks slid into the bay and created a lid that trapped sulfide in the muddy bottom and kept oxygen out. Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission

Dying seagrass and ‘yellow fog’ signal trouble for Florida Bay

October 03, 2015 5:52 PM

More Videos

Miami mayor makes case for infrastructure improvements to protect from King Tide flooding 1:34

Miami mayor makes case for infrastructure improvements to protect from King Tide flooding

Trump feuds with Congresswoman over call to fallen soldier's widow 1:16

Trump feuds with Congresswoman over call to fallen soldier's widow

Tense police car chase in Puerto Rico 3:39

Tense police car chase in Puerto Rico

Trump addresses relationship with Congress, soldier deaths in Niger and more 3:07

Trump addresses relationship with Congress, soldier deaths in Niger and more

Lawmakers tour Miami-Dade juvenile lockup 1:35

Lawmakers tour Miami-Dade juvenile lockup

Miami Beach police chief holds press conference after woman is killed by officer 1:35

Miami Beach police chief holds press conference after woman is killed by officer

Dolphins coach Adam Gase says he only listens to himself on coaching decisions 1:14

Dolphins coach Adam Gase says he only listens to himself on coaching decisions

How to make money playing video games 2:10

How to make money playing video games

How the Caribbean is trying to ‘Return to Happiness’ post hurricanes Irma and Maria 2:09

How the Caribbean is trying to ‘Return to Happiness’ post hurricanes Irma and Maria

A Miami congressional candidate talks about her encounters with extraterrestrials 8:56

A Miami congressional candidate talks about her encounters with extraterrestrials

  • Miami mayor makes case for infrastructure improvements to protect from King Tide flooding

    City of Miami mayor Tomás Regalado, inspects "King Tide" flooding at the intersection of 10 ave. and northeast 79th st.