Marcie Davis with her bee hives in her backyard, Monday, Sept. 8, 2014. Marcie Davis heard the state had changed a law to allow backyard bee hives, she decided to become a "foster mother" and contacted a registered beekeeper to put hives on our one-acre lot near Killian High School. Davis had kept bee hives with her family, but after her son left and she got divorced gave it up. But within a year, a county code inspector issued her a violation for breaking county ordinances by having 10-12 hives, twice the number allowed by the county. Davis now finds herself in the middle of a growing legal fight.
Marcie Davis with her bee hives in her backyard, Monday, Sept. 8, 2014. Marcie Davis heard the state had changed a law to allow backyard bee hives, she decided to become a "foster mother" and contacted a registered beekeeper to put hives on our one-acre lot near Killian High School. Davis had kept bee hives with her family, but after her son left and she got divorced gave it up. But within a year, a county code inspector issued her a violation for breaking county ordinances by having 10-12 hives, twice the number allowed by the county. Davis now finds herself in the middle of a growing legal fight. WALTER MICHOT MIAMI HERALD STAFF
Marcie Davis with her bee hives in her backyard, Monday, Sept. 8, 2014. Marcie Davis heard the state had changed a law to allow backyard bee hives, she decided to become a "foster mother" and contacted a registered beekeeper to put hives on our one-acre lot near Killian High School. Davis had kept bee hives with her family, but after her son left and she got divorced gave it up. But within a year, a county code inspector issued her a violation for breaking county ordinances by having 10-12 hives, twice the number allowed by the county. Davis now finds herself in the middle of a growing legal fight. WALTER MICHOT MIAMI HERALD STAFF

Florida fights to save dwindling honeybees

September 15, 2014 6:42 PM