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  • Video: Miami Beach waging a battle against sea level rise

    Miami Beach has put into action an aggressive and expensive plan to combat the effects of sea level rise. As some streets keep flooding from recent king tide events, the city continues rolling out its plan of attack and will spend between $400-$500 million over the next five years doing so.

Miami Beach has put into action an aggressive and expensive plan to combat the effects of sea level rise. As some streets keep flooding from recent king tide events, the city continues rolling out its plan of attack and will spend between $400-$500 million over the next five years doing so. Emily Michot emichot@miamiherald.com
Miami Beach has put into action an aggressive and expensive plan to combat the effects of sea level rise. As some streets keep flooding from recent king tide events, the city continues rolling out its plan of attack and will spend between $400-$500 million over the next five years doing so. Emily Michot emichot@miamiherald.com

King tide causes flooding in parts of South Florida

October 27, 2015 11:47 AM

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  • History Channel announces special program on the history of global soccer

    International soccer star, David Villa, was in attendance of the History Channel’s 14-day program celebrating the global history of soccer during NATPE convention at the Fontaine Bleu in Miami Beach, Florida.