In the last 40 years, 98 percent of the staghorn coral on the Florida reef tract have been wiped out. The coral are among the fastest growing and provide a key building block in reefs. University of Miami researchers have now found feeding the endangered coral supplements can help them withstand increasingly harsh ocean conditions.
In the last 40 years, 98 percent of the staghorn coral on the Florida reef tract have been wiped out. The coral are among the fastest growing and provide a key building block in reefs. University of Miami researchers have now found feeding the endangered coral supplements can help them withstand increasingly harsh ocean conditions. University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science
In the last 40 years, 98 percent of the staghorn coral on the Florida reef tract have been wiped out. The coral are among the fastest growing and provide a key building block in reefs. University of Miami researchers have now found feeding the endangered coral supplements can help them withstand increasingly harsh ocean conditions. University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science

Miami-Dade County

May 05, 2015 7:18 PM

UM study: ‘Fattened up’ coral could be better at fighting climate change

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