In this Tuesday, Aug. 19, 2014 photo, Dr. Marie-Denise Gervais talks to Amos LeClerc as she performs an examination on him at a clinic in a Miami high school. More than 50 percent of Florida’s Medicaid recipients are under the age of 18, according to state officials. This month, the Florida Legislature learned that private insurers managing care for Florida’s estimated 4 million Medicaid beneficiaries were underpaid about $433 million over the past two years. The underpayments will repaid by federal and state officials, with Florida responsible for about $173 million.
In this Tuesday, Aug. 19, 2014 photo, Dr. Marie-Denise Gervais talks to Amos LeClerc as she performs an examination on him at a clinic in a Miami high school. More than 50 percent of Florida’s Medicaid recipients are under the age of 18, according to state officials. This month, the Florida Legislature learned that private insurers managing care for Florida’s estimated 4 million Medicaid beneficiaries were underpaid about $433 million over the past two years. The underpayments will repaid by federal and state officials, with Florida responsible for about $173 million. J Pat Carter AP
In this Tuesday, Aug. 19, 2014 photo, Dr. Marie-Denise Gervais talks to Amos LeClerc as she performs an examination on him at a clinic in a Miami high school. More than 50 percent of Florida’s Medicaid recipients are under the age of 18, according to state officials. This month, the Florida Legislature learned that private insurers managing care for Florida’s estimated 4 million Medicaid beneficiaries were underpaid about $433 million over the past two years. The underpayments will repaid by federal and state officials, with Florida responsible for about $173 million. J Pat Carter AP

A $433 million mistake: State, feds underpaid Florida Medicaid insurers for two years

June 13, 2016 03:44 PM

UPDATED June 13, 2016 06:24 PM

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