Federal health officials urging doctors in U.S. to test newborns showing signs of the deadly Zika virus. In this Jan. 18, 2016, file photo, a female Aedes aegypti mosquito acquires a blood meal on the arm of a researcher at the Biomedical Sciences Institute in the Sao Paulo's University in Sao Paulo, Brazil.
Federal health officials urging doctors in U.S. to test newborns showing signs of the deadly Zika virus. In this Jan. 18, 2016, file photo, a female Aedes aegypti mosquito acquires a blood meal on the arm of a researcher at the Biomedical Sciences Institute in the Sao Paulo's University in Sao Paulo, Brazil. Andre Penner AP
Federal health officials urging doctors in U.S. to test newborns showing signs of the deadly Zika virus. In this Jan. 18, 2016, file photo, a female Aedes aegypti mosquito acquires a blood meal on the arm of a researcher at the Biomedical Sciences Institute in the Sao Paulo's University in Sao Paulo, Brazil. Andre Penner AP

Zika virus may not be in South Florida yet, but it has the potential to be

January 26, 2016 9:22 PM