Andrew Miller, an FIU medical school student, meets with Sarah Braxton regularly to help her stay healthy. Miller works with the university's NeighborhoodHELP program, which aims to teach students how they should address the health and socioeconomic needs of low-income communities.
Andrew Miller, an FIU medical school student, meets with Sarah Braxton regularly to help her stay healthy. Miller works with the university's NeighborhoodHELP program, which aims to teach students how they should address the health and socioeconomic needs of low-income communities. MATIAS J. OCNER mocner@miamiherald.com
Andrew Miller, an FIU medical school student, meets with Sarah Braxton regularly to help her stay healthy. Miller works with the university's NeighborhoodHELP program, which aims to teach students how they should address the health and socioeconomic needs of low-income communities. MATIAS J. OCNER mocner@miamiherald.com

Yes, these doctors and med students make house calls

February 26, 2016 06:34 PM

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