HEALING TOUCH: Ivanna Cardenas and David Gutierrez, the parents of quadruplets born prematurely, perform massages to stimulate growth. They have learned how to do this from Tiffany Field, the University of Miami researcher who pioneered massaging to stimulate growth for preemies.
HEALING TOUCH: Ivanna Cardenas and David Gutierrez, the parents of quadruplets born prematurely, perform massages to stimulate growth. They have learned how to do this from Tiffany Field, the University of Miami researcher who pioneered massaging to stimulate growth for preemies. C.W. Griffin Miami Herald Staff
HEALING TOUCH: Ivanna Cardenas and David Gutierrez, the parents of quadruplets born prematurely, perform massages to stimulate growth. They have learned how to do this from Tiffany Field, the University of Miami researcher who pioneered massaging to stimulate growth for preemies. C.W. Griffin Miami Herald Staff

UM researcher pioneered massaging premature infants to stimulate growth

November 04, 2014 03:00 PM

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