SUPPORTIVE FAMILY: Sujato Santiago, left, with her husband Joshua and sons Raj, 2, and Aaron, 6, was 34 when she was diagnosed with breast cancer earlier this year.
SUPPORTIVE FAMILY: Sujato Santiago, left, with her husband Joshua and sons Raj, 2, and Aaron, 6, was 34 when she was diagnosed with breast cancer earlier this year. Jon Durr Miami Herald Staff
SUPPORTIVE FAMILY: Sujato Santiago, left, with her husband Joshua and sons Raj, 2, and Aaron, 6, was 34 when she was diagnosed with breast cancer earlier this year. Jon Durr Miami Herald Staff

Younger women with breast cancer face more obstacles

October 13, 2014 06:34 PM

UPDATED October 15, 2014 11:42 AM

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