Liana Martinez, left, and Suraia Akhter, both 11 and in 6th grade, climb the rock wall in the fitness center at Nautilus Middle School, 4301 North Michigan Av., on Miami Beach, Wednesday, November 23, 2011. Jayne Greenberg runs Miami-Dade County Public Schools' P.E. program on a shoestring, and is responsible for helping to get fitness centers, like this one, into Miami-Dade County Public Schools.
Liana Martinez, left, and Suraia Akhter, both 11 and in 6th grade, climb the rock wall in the fitness center at Nautilus Middle School, 4301 North Michigan Av., on Miami Beach, Wednesday, November 23, 2011. Jayne Greenberg runs Miami-Dade County Public Schools' P.E. program on a shoestring, and is responsible for helping to get fitness centers, like this one, into Miami-Dade County Public Schools. MARICE COHN BAND MIAMI HERALD STAFF
Liana Martinez, left, and Suraia Akhter, both 11 and in 6th grade, climb the rock wall in the fitness center at Nautilus Middle School, 4301 North Michigan Av., on Miami Beach, Wednesday, November 23, 2011. Jayne Greenberg runs Miami-Dade County Public Schools' P.E. program on a shoestring, and is responsible for helping to get fitness centers, like this one, into Miami-Dade County Public Schools. MARICE COHN BAND MIAMI HERALD STAFF

UN: Miami-Dade Schools’ PE program has transformed students’ fitness

May 01, 2015 03:01 PM

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