In this Wednesday, Sept. 7, 2016, file photo, Apple CEO Tim Cook announces the new iPhone 7 during an event to announce new products, in San Francisco. A recent study by San Diego State psychology professor and author Jean Twenge documents how the iPhone — and all smart devices — have affected the mental health and social development of a generation that has never known a world without them.
In this Wednesday, Sept. 7, 2016, file photo, Apple CEO Tim Cook announces the new iPhone 7 during an event to announce new products, in San Francisco. A recent study by San Diego State psychology professor and author Jean Twenge documents how the iPhone — and all smart devices — have affected the mental health and social development of a generation that has never known a world without them. Marcio Jose Sanchez AP File Photo
In this Wednesday, Sept. 7, 2016, file photo, Apple CEO Tim Cook announces the new iPhone 7 during an event to announce new products, in San Francisco. A recent study by San Diego State psychology professor and author Jean Twenge documents how the iPhone — and all smart devices — have affected the mental health and social development of a generation that has never known a world without them. Marcio Jose Sanchez AP File Photo

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