This combination of photos taken at late-night campaign rallies shortly after midnight on Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2016, shows Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton in Raleigh, N.C., and Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump in Grand Rapids, Mich.
This combination of photos taken at late-night campaign rallies shortly after midnight on Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2016, shows Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton in Raleigh, N.C., and Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump in Grand Rapids, Mich. Gerry Broome AP
This combination of photos taken at late-night campaign rallies shortly after midnight on Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2016, shows Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton in Raleigh, N.C., and Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump in Grand Rapids, Mich. Gerry Broome AP

How to talk to your children about politics — and respect of others’ views

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