OPENING NIGHT SWIM: Endurance swimmer Diana Nyad ‘swims’ on The Studios of Key West theater stage Feb. 19, 2015, at the opening of her ‘Onward! The Diana Nyad Story,’ her one-woman play that recreates her 111-mile Cuba-to-Key West swim in September 2013. Her next athletic challenge will be a walk across America in 2016 to raise awareness of the obesity epidemic in the country.
OPENING NIGHT SWIM: Endurance swimmer Diana Nyad ‘swims’ on The Studios of Key West theater stage Feb. 19, 2015, at the opening of her ‘Onward! The Diana Nyad Story,’ her one-woman play that recreates her 111-mile Cuba-to-Key West swim in September 2013. Her next athletic challenge will be a walk across America in 2016 to raise awareness of the obesity epidemic in the country. Rob O'Neal Florida Keys News Bureau
OPENING NIGHT SWIM: Endurance swimmer Diana Nyad ‘swims’ on The Studios of Key West theater stage Feb. 19, 2015, at the opening of her ‘Onward! The Diana Nyad Story,’ her one-woman play that recreates her 111-mile Cuba-to-Key West swim in September 2013. Her next athletic challenge will be a walk across America in 2016 to raise awareness of the obesity epidemic in the country. Rob O'Neal Florida Keys News Bureau

Diana Nyad to walk across America to help end obesity

February 20, 2015 07:00 AM

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