Suzie Silverman at her Cooper City home, Sept. 20, 2016. Ten years ago, Suzie Silverman, then 37, felt a painful lump, which she likened to an underwire poking out of her bra. She was diagnosed with Stage 4 breast cancer. Now 47, Silverman just celebrated being 10 years cancer free. She isn’t cured, but rather stable.
Suzie Silverman at her Cooper City home, Sept. 20, 2016. Ten years ago, Suzie Silverman, then 37, felt a painful lump, which she likened to an underwire poking out of her bra. She was diagnosed with Stage 4 breast cancer. Now 47, Silverman just celebrated being 10 years cancer free. She isn’t cured, but rather stable. CHARLES TRAINOR JR ctrainor@miamiherald.com
Suzie Silverman at her Cooper City home, Sept. 20, 2016. Ten years ago, Suzie Silverman, then 37, felt a painful lump, which she likened to an underwire poking out of her bra. She was diagnosed with Stage 4 breast cancer. Now 47, Silverman just celebrated being 10 years cancer free. She isn’t cured, but rather stable. CHARLES TRAINOR JR ctrainor@miamiherald.com

Living for years with late-stage breast cancer

October 10, 2016 10:03 PM

UPDATED October 10, 2016 10:03 PM

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