In a Thursday, May 7, 2015 file photo, New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady gestures during an event at Salem State University in Salem, Mass. Blurring the line between legal and illegal, then figuring out how to get away with it, is as old as keeping score. But what two New England Patriots employees did when they executed a plan to deflate footballs to Brady's liking, according to a report authored by attorney Ted Wells, was a direct violation of a well-defined rule about equipment that didn't leave room for shades of gray.
In a Thursday, May 7, 2015 file photo, New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady gestures during an event at Salem State University in Salem, Mass. Blurring the line between legal and illegal, then figuring out how to get away with it, is as old as keeping score. But what two New England Patriots employees did when they executed a plan to deflate footballs to Brady's liking, according to a report authored by attorney Ted Wells, was a direct violation of a well-defined rule about equipment that didn't leave room for shades of gray. Charles Krupa AP
In a Thursday, May 7, 2015 file photo, New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady gestures during an event at Salem State University in Salem, Mass. Blurring the line between legal and illegal, then figuring out how to get away with it, is as old as keeping score. But what two New England Patriots employees did when they executed a plan to deflate footballs to Brady's liking, according to a report authored by attorney Ted Wells, was a direct violation of a well-defined rule about equipment that didn't leave room for shades of gray. Charles Krupa AP