Fish Bytes

Giancarlo Stanton: Injury a ‘little speed bump’

Miami Marlins’ Giancarlo Stanton (27) is checked out by trainer Mike Kozak after being hit by a pitch in the first inning during the game against the Pittsburgh Pirates at PNC Park on June 10, 2017 in Pittsburgh.
Miami Marlins’ Giancarlo Stanton (27) is checked out by trainer Mike Kozak after being hit by a pitch in the first inning during the game against the Pittsburgh Pirates at PNC Park on June 10, 2017 in Pittsburgh. Getty Images

Giancarlo Stanton was understandably angry and frustrated when he was hit by a Trevor Williams pitch that injured his wrist and knocked him out of Saturday’s game.

Given his history of injuries, who could blame him?

“I mean, I’ve had my season taken away from me too many times for this crap to happen,” Stanton said of his latest injury. “So it’s not taken away from me. But it’s a little speed bump.”

Stanton and the Marlins were able to breathe a sigh of relief after the early prognosis showed the slugger sustained a bruised right wrist. X-rays were negative.

Stanton doesn’t think Williams tried to hit him intentionally.

“[The Pirates have] been overly trying to pound me inside the whole series,” said Stanton, who crushed a tape-measure home run on Friday night. “They were just trying hard, making sure I didn’t get extended, don’t do what I did [Friday].”

Stanton’s wrist was clipped by a 95-mph fastball. After the decision was made to take him out of the game, Stanton slammed his helmet against his thigh upon entering the Marlins’ dugout.

He thought his wrist had been broken.

“I had some weird sensations there, my hand going numb and stuff,” Stanton said.

Now it could be only a matter of days, depending on the swelling, before Stanton can return to the lineup.

VERY LONG BALL

So just how far did Stanton’s home run travel on Friday at PNC Park?

It depends on the source.

Statcast, which employs advanced technology but hasn’t been around that long, put the distance at 449 feet. ESPN Stats and Info, which has been calculating distances for close to 10 years, had it at 465 feet.

Either way, the blast required a tape measure. The ball cleared the batter’s eye in center, struck a railing and bounced back onto the field.

“It was 465 for sure, if not farther,” said Marlins reliever Nick Wittgren, who was seated near the batter’s eye in the Marlins’ bullpen. “It’s just like every other home run for him. I caught a glimpse of it going over the batter’s eye and I was like, ‘Oh my God.’ 

According to ESPN, whose records date to 2009, it was one of only two home runs hit by a visiting player at PNC that surpassed 460 feet. The other was hit by the Yankees’ Aaron Judge.

Stanton said he tried launching one over the batter’s eye during pregame batting practice on Friday, but to no avail.

“I need to get it out of the stadium. It popped back in,” Stanton said, tongue in cheek.

BACK TO MINORS

Reliever Brian Ellington punched his own ticket for a return trip to the minors Friday when he allowed a large lead to slip by walking the first two batters he faced and giving up a single to the third.

Ellington was optioned to Triple A New Orleans on Saturday. The Marlins recalled right-handed reliever Drew Steckenrider to take his place in the bullpen.

“It’s hard to use him when he’s not going to throw the ball over the plate,” manager Don Mattingly said of Ellington. “[He] put us in danger [Friday night]. We know he’s got a big arm, and there’s definitely potential there. But he’s got to be better than that or it’s hard to use him.”

When Ellington faltered in the ninth, Mattingly was forced to bring in Wittgren to close out the inning and had A.J. Ramos begin warming in the bullpen in case the Pirates continued to peck away at the lead.

COMING UP

▪ Sunday: Marlins LHP Jeff Locke (0-1, 3.48 ERA) at Pittsburgh Pirates RHP Ivan Nova (5-4, 3.04), 1:35 p.m., PNC Park.

▪ Monday: Off day.

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