Barry Jackson

Tunsil knows more is needed. And some of Dolphins’ coverage numbers are dismal.

Ruben Carter, left, and Laremy Tunsil, participate in offensive line drills during practice. Miami Dolphins held early morning practice at their training facility in Davie, Florida on Sun., Aug. 14, 2016.
Ruben Carter, left, and Laremy Tunsil, participate in offensive line drills during practice. Miami Dolphins held early morning practice at their training facility in Davie, Florida on Sun., Aug. 14, 2016. cjuste@miamiherald.com

A six-pack of Dolphins notes on a Wednesday in which Miami hired former Titans and Bears offensive coordinator Dowell Loggains for the same job (with Adam Gase continuing to call the plays and Clyde Christensen to be offered another position):

• Left tackle Laremy Tunsil finished a disappointing season allowing five sacks, seven hits, 20 hurries and committed 12 penalties (third among all NFL offensive linemen) and ranking 77th of 87 tackles in run blocking (per Pro Football Focus).

Overall, PFF ranked him 48th among tackles.

"This season was not how I wanted it to be," he said, indicating he’s committed to improving.

The Dolphins have made clear they expect more.

• The Dolphins’ safeties must improve in pass coverage.

Per PFF, the final passer ratings against Dolphins safeties were 120.9 vs. Reshad Jones, 112.3 vs. T.J.McDonald and 155.8 vs. Nate Allen. Michael Thomas was fine in pass coverage (52.9 rating against).

Thomas and Allen are impending free agents.

• Dolphins linebackers weren’t any better in pass coverage.

Consider this: Not a single Dolphins linebacker allowed a passer rating of below 100 in his coverage area.

The rating was 118 against Kiko Alonso, 112.9 against Lawrence Timmons, 106 against Stephone Anthony, 106.3 against Mike Hull and 104.2 against Chase Allen.

Per PFF, 78 of the 92 passes thrown against Alonso were caught for 814 yards, the most against any NFL linebacker in pass coverage (by a margin of 212 yards).

• In Alonso’s defense, the Dolphins made it difficult for him by moving him from middle linebacker (his preferred position) and declining to move him back to the middle even after Raekwon McMillan’s season-ending knee injury in the first preseason game.

The Dolphins have to do what they believe is best, but that was a disservice to Alonso and one reason for his uneven play.

Alonso does shift to the middle when the Dolphins go to two-linebacker sets, which happens a lot. But he opens games outside.

Alonso sometimes was out of position because he was covering for teammates who weren’t doing their job.

And the Dolphins put Alonso in coverage far too much. When Matt Burke was asked about this, he asked if we had a better option.

• The Dolphins’ final offensive numbers were thoroughly gruesome: last in third-down conversions, 28th in points per game, 25th in yards per game, 29th in rushing yards per game, 24th in passing yards per game, 30th in percentage of passes intercepted, 25th in first downs per game.

They were above average in only two categories: sacks allowed per pass play (10th), and seventh in field goal percentage, with Cody Parker finishing 21 for 23.

• The Dolphins signed eight players to futures contracts to retain their rights this offseason: cornerback Taveze Calhoun, quarterback Brandon Doughty, tackle Sean Hickey, former UM cornerback Tracy Howard, wide receivers Malcolm Lewis and Drew Morgan, running back Brandon Radcliff and defensive end Jonathan Woodard.

Howard, a cornerback at UM, said Miami wants to develop him at safety, which he likes. “You’re more involved at safety,” said Howard, who played in 15 games for Cleveland in 2016. 

Here’s part 2 of my 5-part Marlins series examining Derek Jeter’s top secret Project Wolverine business plan and what he has told investors.

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