Barry Jackson

Analysts give high pass-rushing marks to Dolphins’ pick Godchaux

Florida running back Jordan Scarlett (25) carries past LSU defensive tackle Davon Godchaux and defensive tackle Greg Gilmore (99) in the second half an NCAA college football game in Baton Rouge, La., Saturday, Nov. 19, 2016. Florida won 16-10.
Florida running back Jordan Scarlett (25) carries past LSU defensive tackle Davon Godchaux and defensive tackle Greg Gilmore (99) in the second half an NCAA college football game in Baton Rouge, La., Saturday, Nov. 19, 2016. Florida won 16-10. AP

Reaction on LSU defensive tackle Davon Godchaux, who was selected 178th overall by the Dolphins in Saturday’s draft:

• The good news is he had 74 combined pressures (14 sacks, 15 hits and 45 hurries) in his final two years in college....Godchaux had a rough life growing up in Louisiana; his home was riddled by bullets in a drive-by shooting targeting one of his brothers....Godchaux was arrested for allegedly grabbing his ex-girlfriend’s hair and shoulder during the 2016 offseason, but the charges were dropped. Godchaux was suspended in late September on those charges of false imprisonment, domestic abuse battery and child endangerment, but the charges were dropped shortly after due to inconsistent statements from the "victim.

• Pro Football Focus:

What he does best:

Dangerous pass-rusher, recorded 17 knockdowns and 32 total pressures in 2017.

Refined pass-rush technique, possesses a range of finesse moves to get into the backfield.

Displays good hand placement to maintain spacing with offensive lineman attempting to kick slide.

Shows decent bend and ability to change direction in the backfield.

Good awareness, consistently tracks QB movement in pocket and intended running lanes.

Moves well laterally, can disengage with a jump step to find free lanes to the quarterback.

Biggest concern:

Strength can be an issue, frequently forced to retreat at the POA.

Manhandled consistently by single blocks, gives ground consistently widening running lanes.

Struggled against solo tight end blocks, not a good look for an interior defensive lineman.

Allowed himself to be reached from 5-technique by a backside tight end on one ugly rep.

Doesn’t always display maximum effort when battling multiple blockers.

Poor balance against double teams, has to sink low to generate traction which often leads to overextension.

Wound up on the deck time after time.

Not particularly explosive, slow reaction times.

Bottom line: “While he made strides last season, Godchaux has not been great against the run throughout his career and he’ll have to make his mark as a pass-rusher in the NFL. He’s been one of the more efficient pass-rushers in the nation over the last three years, and he has a chance to rush the passer in nickel and dime situations while working to improve his work in the run game.”

• NFL.com’s Lance Zierlein:

STRENGTHS: “Gets out of his stance and into the blocker with good hip explosion. Plays with proper pad level at point of attack to create desired leverage. Hands-first striker who gets early arm extension. Utilizes hands and leverage for quality read-react positioning in the trenches. Hard to turn out of hole by single blockers. Well-coached. Has feel for double teams and looks to take them on quickly and with proper technique. Shows some early gap quickness when allowed to play upfield. Creates his best pass-rush opening with arm-over move. Decent pursuit quickness and makes attempts to chase down screen passes from backside.”

WEAKNESSES: “Short-limbed pass rusher with squatty build of a bulldog. Undersized for interior work. Has issues fighting off double teams. Has difficult time reaching through the edge and pulling himself over the top. Might need more snaps off as motor seems to lose gas. Guards with a strong anchor put his pass rush in neutral. Often last defensive lineman out of his stance. Not very instinctive. Guards able to reach and hook his outside shoulder to seal him on play-side. Needs quicker disengage to tackle. Sack numbers came against lesser competition.”

Zierlein’s BOTTOM LINE: “Undersized three-technique who played with the punch and arm extension to set a strong edge even though he might be a better fit for a one-gap unit. Options could be limited as he lacks the mass to hold up against double teams, and he might be missing the traits to create quick wins as a pass rusher. He projects as a 4-3 rotational tackle with very little sub-package value.”

• Tony Pauline: “He’s an explosive and relatively athletic defensive line prospect who can play in a variety of systems and someone I stamped with a first round grade before the season."

Mel Kiper and Todd McShay can’t agree on Miami fifth-round pick Isaac Asiata. Please click here for that.

  Comments