Armando Salguero

The cost of trading for Seattle Seahawks cornerback Richard Sherman: Steep

Seattle Seahawks head coach Pete Carroll talks with cornerback Richard Sherman during an NFC wild card playoff game against the Detroit Lions.
Seattle Seahawks head coach Pete Carroll talks with cornerback Richard Sherman during an NFC wild card playoff game against the Detroit Lions. AP

The Seattle Seahawks are shopping a potential trade for cornerback Richard Sherman, and it’s now clear any NFL team willing to consider such a proposition must be ready to pay dearly for the chance to add one of the league’s premier players.

The specific asking price for Sherman?

The Seahawks have let it be known they would consider trading Sherman, but only for “a very good player plus a high draft pick,” according to an NFL source.

And that’s just the team-to-team cost of a potential deal.

Sherman, who has some leverage in deciding where he would play, would want to go to a team that has a chance to compete for a Super Bowl, which may eliminate perhaps more than half of the NFL’s 32 teams. Sherman is also not giving any money back on his current contract, the source said.

Sherman’s contract has two years remaining and will pay $11.4 million this year and $11 million next year, with salary cap costs above $13 million each year.

So based on Seattle’s demands and the high-priced Sherman’s wishes about what teams he’d be willing to play for, it is unlikely the perennial Pro Bowl player will find himself anywhere other than Seattle in 2017.

“Very little chance it happens, but both sides are listening,” Sherman told MMQB. “I honestly don’t have much more to say about it than what I’ve already said. We have a great relationship, . . . There is a lot of love and respect. There is no bad blood.”

In the unlikely event trade talks become serious and lead to a deal -- again, not probable -- the timing of such an exchange would likely be centered around the April 27-29 draft.

And so now you’re asking what teams might be interested in Sherman?

Any team with a need for an outstanding cornerback. That’s a lot of teams.

Any team willing to part with a player and a pick. The number dwindles considerably.

Any team willing to part with a player, a pick and also has the cap space to fit an enormous cap hit right away.

So are the Miami Dolphins such a team?

That’s impossible to know with certainty because, like most teams, the Dolphins don’t simply tell folks their trade intentions. But given Miami’s cap situation and the cost of drafting and extending players such as Jarvis Landry, which the team may do before training camp, the chances are nearly zero Miami gets involved.

The Dolphins have $20.3 million in cap space according to the National Football League’s Players Association Thursday salary cap report.

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