Miami Marlins

Miami Marlins lose Giancarlo Stanton to injury, game to Pirates

A team trainer, right, examines the hand of Miami Marlins' Giancarlo Stanton, left, after Stanton was hit by a pitch from Pittsburgh Pirates starter Trevor Williams in the first inning of a baseball game in Pittsburgh, Saturday, June 10, 2017. Stanton left the game after the examination.
A team trainer, right, examines the hand of Miami Marlins' Giancarlo Stanton, left, after Stanton was hit by a pitch from Pittsburgh Pirates starter Trevor Williams in the first inning of a baseball game in Pittsburgh, Saturday, June 10, 2017. Stanton left the game after the examination. AP

The Marlins lost Giancarlo Stanton early on Saturday, the result of a 95-mph fastball that clipped the slugger’s right wrist and sent him to the training room.

They lost the game late when reliever David Phelps allowed a two-run lead slip through his grasp in an eventual 7-6 setback to the Pirates at PNC Park.

All things considered, it could have turned out worse for the Marlins.

The initial diagnosis provided by the Marlins on the oft-injured Stanton was a bruised wrist. X-rays were negative, and he was listed as day to day.

Marlins Pirates Baseball (10)
A team trainer, right, examines the hand of Miami Marlins' Giancarlo Stanton, left, after Stanton was hit by a pitch from Pittsburgh Pirates starter Trevor Williams in the first inning of a baseball game in Pittsburgh, Saturday, June 10, 2017. Stanton left the game after the examination. Gene J. Puskar AP

“I’m just glad it’s not broken,” Stanton said. “I thought it was snapped.”

Stanton was struck by a Trevor Williams fastball in the first inning and winced in pain as he made his way slowly to first base. After the team trainer and manager Don Mattingly made their way out to confer with him, Stanton was taken out.

“It ballooned up pretty quick,” Mattingly said.

Mattingly and Stanton both said it’s uncertain how much time he’ll miss.

“It could be a few days. It could be a day,” Mattingly said. “He could walk in here tomorrow thinking he can play. If he’s ready to play, he’s ready to play.”

More than likely, Stanton won’t play Sunday. The Marlins have a day off on Monday before facing Oakland in Miami on Tuesday.

“(I’ve) got to wait until the bruising goes down and I can turn over properly, rotate,” Stanton said.

Once play resumed, the Marlins struck back with consecutive RBI doubles from Marcell Ozuna and J.T. Realmuto that gave them a 3-0 lead. But the pitching for the Marlins on Saturday was less than spectacular.

The Marlins lost the Pirates on Saturday, June 10, 2017, in which Giancarlo Stanton was injured when he was hit by a pitch.

Dan Straily, who has been the Marlins’ most consistent starter, turned in a subpar performance, allowing four runs on nine hits in four innings as the Pirates hit him like no other team this season. Entering Saturday, opponents were hitting just .198 against Straily, the seventh-best figure in the majors.

“Plain and simple, I just didn’t have it today,” Straily said.

Marlins Pirates Baseball (8)
Miami Marlins starting pitcher Dan Straily delivers in the first inning of a baseball game against the Pittsburgh Pirates in Pittsburgh, Saturday, June 10, 2017. Gene J. Puskar AP

Still, the Marlins carried a 6-4 lead into the seventh inning thanks to back-to-back homers in the fourth by Realmuto and Derek Dietrich, and another RBI double in the fifth by Realmuto.

But the Marlins couldn’t make it stick.

After giving up an infield hit to Andrew McCutchen and walking Elias Diaz, Phelps gave up a game-tying two-run triple to Jordy Mercer that was almost caught by Christian Yelich. Yelich raced into the gap to get to the ball. But it hit his glove and dropped.

“Just popped out,” Yelich said. “I kind of expect to hang on to those balls and just wasn’t able to do it. Got there in plenty of time and just clanked it.”

Phelps then gave up a go-ahead double to John Jaso and the Marlins never recovered.

“The walk is the bad one,” Phelps said of the deciding sequence. “(McCutchen) hits the ball 12 feet and it’s a base hit. Whatever. You’ve just got to make better pitches to the next guy (Diaz). That’s the guy right there I’ve got to put the ball in play.”

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