Hurricane

Where do you park a $15 million car during a hurricane?

Brett David, the CEO of Prestige Imports, drives a $15 million Pagani Zonda into the car elevator at the Porsche Design Tower in Sunny Isles Beach.
Brett David, the CEO of Prestige Imports, drives a $15 million Pagani Zonda into the car elevator at the Porsche Design Tower in Sunny Isles Beach.

Here’s one thing we have in common with the mega-wealthy: They, too, stress out over where to park their cars during a hurricane.

Prestige Imports, the dealer of ultra-luxury vehicles specializing in brands such as Lamborghini, Pagani, Lotus and Ferrari, reached out to developer Gil Dezer on Tuesday to ask if they could use the vacant penthouse at the Porsche Design Tower, the Sunny Isles Beach where owners can use elevators to park their cars inside their luxury condos.

The four-story penthouse — asking price $32.5 million — is large enough to fit 11 cars.

The 10 cars Prestige tucked away inside the 56th-floor pad are worth a combined total of $25 million: Two Pagani Huayras ($2.8 million each), a Pagani Zonda HP Barchetta ($15 million), a Ferrari LaFerrari ($3.8 million), a Mercedes Benz SLR 722S convertible ($1 million), a 1989 Lamborghini Countach ($700,000) and a 1967 Shelby GT500 Fastback ($300,000).

Brett David, CEO of Prestige Imports, drove the cars into the tower himself, because you can’t trust wheels like these to valet parkers.

Brett David, the CEO of Prestige Imports, rides the car elevator at the Porsche building in Sunny Isle Beach, Florida to the 56th-floor penthouse of the Porsche Design Tower in a Pagani Zonda worth $15 million.

The penthouse is one of only six units left to sell at the Porsche Design Tower, which was completed in January. The cheapest condos in the building started at $3.5 million.

Although 90 percent of condo owners in the tower haven’t moved in yet, they stored more than 60 pricey cars in their units in advance of Hurricane Irma. Because what good is a super-expensive pad big enough to park your car inside if you don’t use it?

Besides, it’s not only the super-rich who stash their automobiles inside their homes to protect them during hurricanes.

Rene Rodriguez: 305-376-3611, @ReneMiamiHerald

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