Hurricane

What’s the latest Hurricane Irma path?

Hurricane Irma is now a Category 5 storm

Hurricane Irma has maximum sustained winds of 175 mph, says NOAA. Hurricane warnings are in effect for the Leeward Islands and Irma is also expected to affect Puerto Rico & the British and U.S. Virgin Islands on Wednesday.
Up Next
Hurricane Irma has maximum sustained winds of 175 mph, says NOAA. Hurricane warnings are in effect for the Leeward Islands and Irma is also expected to affect Puerto Rico & the British and U.S. Virgin Islands on Wednesday.

The latest track of Hurricane Irma predicts the storm will have a heavy impact on South Florida by Sunday.

A hurricane warning is already in effect for Puerto Rico, Vieques, Culebra, the British and U.S. Virgin Islands and several others, according to the National Hurricane Center’s latest update on Irma at 2 p.m. Tuesday. Warnings are typically issued 36 hours before the storm is expected to make landfall in those areas.

A hurricane watch is in place for Guadeloupe, parts of the Dominican Republic, parts of Haiti, the Turks and Caicos Islands and the southeastern Bahamas.

The eye of Hurricane Irma is supposed to lie directly below the Florida peninsula – directly on top of the Florida Keys – by 8 a.m. Sunday, according to the latest projection by the National Hurricane Center. Sunday at 8 a.m. is currently the latest time NHS has in its predictions, though other models have predicted Irma’s eventual path – with highly varied results.

Screen Shot 2017-09-05 at 9.52.02 AM
Most tracks, under the most recent forecasts, have Irma veering north, straight into South Florida, according to the National Center for Atmospheric Research. National Center for Atmospheric Research

But most tracks, under the most recent forecasts, have Irma veering north, straight into South Florida, according to the National Center for Atmospheric Research. Its path from there is highly varied, with some directly through the state, others on the west coast and others on the east. From there, the path becomes even more uncertain, but parts of Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia and Maryland all seem to be at risk.

Screen Shot 2017-09-05 at 9.52.37 AM
Hurricane Irma’s path after 2 a.m. Sunday is highly unknown, but these are some of the latest projections. National Center for Atmospheric Research

  Comments